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Solar Eclipse Safety On Monday

Eclipse Glasses for Solar Eclipse Safety

Solar eclipse safety is going to be a very big concern this Monday.

That’s especially true if you’re located under the path of eclipse totality.

If that’s where you happen to be, the solar eclipse is going to be absolutely compelling.

It’s not just the big news for August 21.

For many of us, it will be the eclipse of the century.

It’s likely to be dramatic.

It will be something new for you.

It won’t last very long.

Everyone around you will be excited.

You’re definitely going to want to check it out.

And solar eclipse safety is likely to be the last thing on your mind.

Where’s The Path Of Totality?

Solar Eclipse Safety Needed Under Eclipse Path

The Path of Totality for the August 21, 2017 Solar Eclipse.

This total solar eclipse will be visible throughout most of the continental United States.

The path of totality will extend from the Pacific coast in Oregon, across the central U.S., and end off the coast of Charleston, South Carolina.

The path is going to be about 70 miles wide.

If you’re under it, you can expect day to turn into night for a brief time.

But even if you’re not within the exact path, you’re going to be tempted to look up at the eclipse.

You’re going to want to stare.

That’s where solar eclipse safety comes into play.

So What’s Solar Eclipse Safety?

The main concern in solar eclipse safety is taking care of your eyes.

As I was explaining during my radio interview with Michael Yorba and Mervyn Price on Friday, it’s important to have genuine eclipse-viewing glasses if you want to see the solar eclipse.

Good eye protection is essential.

Make sure that your eclipse glasses meet the specifications put out by NASA.

If you don’t have the right eye wear, don’t look at the eclipse directly.

Instead, turn your back to the eclipse and project its light through a pinhole on a piece of cardboard or heavy paper, aiming it at a blank sheet of paper held below it.

This simple pinhole camera will give you a surprisingly clear image of the eclipse progression.

Here’s a quick video that reviews some of the key steps to solar eclipse safety:

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